GAYLETTER

GAYLETTER

Sunday 06.27.21

JW Anderson x Tom of Finland Foundation

1/17

Tuesday 06.22.21

Rify Royalty & Charlene present: TRISH

With performances by Olivia Lux, Vena Cava, Shanita Bump and Boy Radio

Monday 06.21.21

Nemacolin x Susanne Bartsch: Summer Camp Pride

A pride celebration!

Tuesday 06.01.21

Summer Camp: A Pride celebration 2021 hosted by the legendary Susanne Barstch

1/3

Monday 05.24.21

Yannis Tsarouchis: Dancing in Real Life

1/18

Monday 05.03.21

Jean Paul Gaultier Wants You to Have Safer Sex

1/4

Tuesday 04.20.21

4/20 SELFIES

Our 420 community showing us how they celebrate in 2021.

1/19

Friday 04.09.21

The Statuesque Reno Gold

A trip to Ft. Lauderdale beach with the talented young performer

1/21

Sunday 04.04.21

Toy Story

1/8

Tuesday 03.30.21

Bruce of Los Angeles’ greeting cards

1/11

Friday 03.26.21

Bushwig Spring Fling 2021

Spring has sprung and the queens are out at Maria Hernadez Park

Wednesday 03.17.21

IAN FADEN

Ian Faden’s passion for bird watching has informed his painting, and vice versa. He obsesses over feather colorations and beak shapes with the same ardor he might describe the opacities and hues of a particular oil paint. Originally from Massachusetts, he attended Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and now lives and works in Bushwick. His recent paintings and drawings in two series, titled Tales, Tails, Tales & Tails and Fables for the Future, provide glimpses into a world that could be seen as post-apocalyptic or post-human, but might be better understood as post-anthropocentric. In this dimension, humans and animals have experienced a great leveling of power, all naked and attempting to survive, often on equal footing and in direct competition with one another. Instead of following a specific narrative, the work evokes a series of dream-like scenes and loose mythologies that build to form a larger paradigm in which all living beings are but creatures — people are animalistic and animals are personified — both fending for themselves amid tremendous scarcity.

 

Is the crow smarter than the mourning dove? The shifting hierarchy of intelligence and self-awareness is a running theme in Faden’s work. In Yes Court, a mourning dove stands before their own reflection in a cracked mirror held up by a few watchful crows. However, it is difficult to decipher whether the mirror is broken because the bird has foolishly pecked at their own self-image or if Faden has included the crack as a symbol of the bird’s moody interior mental state. …