GAYLETTER

GAYLETTER

Sunday 04.04.21

Toy Story

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Wednesday 03.10.21

Urayoán Noel and Raquel Salas Rivera

This past November, the Friday after Election Day, We spoke with Urayoán Noel and Raquel Salas Rivera, each a Puerto Rican poet, scholar, and performer in their own right.

 

Urayoán called from the Bronx. His seventh book of poetry, Transversal (forthcoming), reconfigures the border between Spanish and English to create new possibilities of their arrangement, fusion, and division. Raquel called from Santurce, Puerto Rico. His eighth book of poems, While They Sleep (Under the Bed is Another Country) (2019), describes in Spanish and differently in English the grief, rage, absurdity, desire, and numbness that are the colonial relationship between Puerto Rico and the United States.

 

We are grateful to both poets for sharing original poetry with us. Read on, where Raquel and Urayoán discuss the historic shifts in today’s Puerto Rico, the island’s anarchist history, finding places to grow, loving Philadelphia, remembering Sylvia Rivera, and building a lineage from 
the cracks.

 

 

Maybe we could begin with an overview of what’s going on in Puerto Rico today.

Raquel: We still have the Oversight and Management Board, la Junta as we call it here, which goes above the legislature and the governor. This election follows a mass movement of a size we haven’t seen in recent history. People have compared it to Vieques. It seems to have broken through a wall, and that’s undoing a belief that has existed for a long time. I grew up hearing we were just too divided as a people, that there was no way we could come together for something. …

Thursday 02.25.21

RENO GOLD

The GAYLETTER Back Page

Reno Gold has been making money from his immaculately sculpted body since he was an 18-year-old stripper in Reno, Nevada. Names he went through before he got to Reno Gold include Sebastian Valentino and Richie Rose. Now at 24, Reno has moved his talents to OnlyFans. He’s been doing it for two years, but in the last year his income on the platform has exploded. Even with the 20 percent cut the company takes, he often manages to pull in over $100,000 a month. In total he’s earned over $1.2 million. The quarantine has been a golden opportunity for Reno.

 

“Covid has been really good for business just because people are craving that human interaction.” Reno now resides in Miami, but he was born in Illinois. He is currently single, telling us that his number one focus is his work. “I talk to my subscribers every single day. When I wake up, I immediately check my messages, answer them, and then hit the gym. Then I come home and film. I think it’d be kind of hard to have a relationship.” When asked to give us an official job description Reno responded with “local Internet hooker” or “digital panhandler.”

 

Reno loves his eyes but he says, “my dick brings me the most pleasure, so he’s gotta be my favorite.” Reno has plenty of fantasies, and he’s been lucky to fulfill some. “I actually lived out one of my fantasies a couple of years ago when I was traveling to Paris.” …

Wednesday 02.10.21

Earth to Ashish

The designer Ashish Gupta treats every season like his last.

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Tuesday 02.09.21

Jordan Firstman

A free flowing conversation with writer and comedian Jordan Firstman about authenticity, unfinished business and being a sassy, hairy jewish sex icon.

Where are you right now? I am on Fire Island.

 

How did you get to FIP during the global pandemic? OMG! We’re already outing me as a Corona traveler. I get tested every week in Los Angeles, got tested Wednesday. I just had to leave L.A., it was just getting to be too much. L.A. in August is really sad.

 

Why is L.A. in August sad? August is a sad month for everyone because we feel the summer ending and we don’t want it to happen. And then L.A. on top of that it’s just a sad city. So, you bring August vibes to L.A. vibes. It just feels like stale and sad, and no one can be free, so I had to bounce.

 

What makes L.A. sad? I think L.A. is all unfinished business. I think there’s a lot of ghosts there. L.A. has only unfinished business. It is literally the land of dreams that were crushed and dreams that never got made.

 

Do you feel like you have a lot of unfinished business? No, I feel like I am doing my business. I can’t believe that I am going to say this, but if I do believe in reincarnation, I feel like we might be close to my last time. If it’s not this one then the next one. I feel like I am close to something.

 

That’s a good place to be in, spiritually, in a city like L.A. Yeah. I feel like you have to be really spiritually strong to be able to navigate such a morally complicated place. …

Wednesday 02.03.21

MAN ON MAN

Roddy Bottum and Joey Holman are the musical duo MAN ON MAN. The two started dating 14 months ago and during quarantine this past spring, they began working on an album together, due out early 2021, they have already released two singles, “Daddy” and “Baby You’re My Everything.” Both songs are gorgeous odes to man-on-man love and lust.

 

“Daddy” is a thumping, melodic rock song made for moving your body, while “Baby You’re My Everything” is slower in tempo and golden-toned — it’s made for smoking weed and cuddling with a lover. The music video for “Baby You’re My Everything” features Roddy and Joey in khakis and casual button-down shirts, meditatively wandering hand-in-hand in the desert. They eventually make it to a river where Roddy baptizes Joey by spitting in his mouth and then dipping him under the water.

 

Roddy has been creating music for decades. During the ’90s he was the keyboardist for the massively popular rock group Faith No More. Joey has been playing music for some time, but is newer to the industry. MAN ON MAN was born out of necessity. Both men had recently lost a parent, and their answer to the grief that was all around them was to get busy. The restrictions OF quarantine only fueled their creativity: “As queer people, we work well with parameters. The history of our culture is judgement and homophobia that we’ve had to work around for our whole lives.”

 

 

How did you two meet? …

Thursday 01.28.21

Junior Mintt

Before the shutdown, Junior Mintt was one of the most booked and busy queens in the New York and Brooklyn drag scene. Junior likens her shows to “queer church” full of “confetti, balloon pops, laughter, costume reveals, comedy mixes, motivational speaking, political statements, great music, and above all respect!” We connected with Junior to discuss her love of candy, the beauty of Black trans power, and who she looks up to the most.

 

What’s the story behind Junior Mintt and her rise? I wouldn’t necessarily say there was a “rise” to Junior Mintt, I prefer to think she was with me from birth. Junior Mintt is the piece of me that kept me going and kept me seeing my own worth when I didn’t think I was worthy of love. Being trans you’re born into a world that reminds you everyday it isn’t meant for you, so growing up I internalized every hurtful thing that everyone would say. From being very overweight to my femme personality to being too nice, Junior Mintt was the voice in my head reminding me that just because I don’t fit in here doesn’t mean I don’t fit in anywhere. Junior Mintt was always there and always knew who I was, it’s just a matter of me getting to know her now.

 

Where does your name come from? My name outside of drag is Junior as well, and when I started drag, I knew I wanted to use my real name. I started off as Junior High, and then when I was rewatching the Seinfeld episode that’s all about Junior Mints, I remembered that growing up my mom would call me her little Junior Mint, and that was the moment when it clicked! …

Wednesday 01.27.21

Five Things I learned from Walter Mercado

For decades, extravagant Puerto Rican astrologer, psychic, and gender nonconforming legend Walter Mercado charmed the world with his televised horoscope forecasts. Equal parts Oprah, Liberace, and Mister Rogers, Walter was a celebrated daily part of Latin American culture, who at his peak reached over 120 million viewers. In our Netflix film 'Mucho Mucho Amor,' my co-director Cristina Costantini and I tell the story of Walter’s unlikely rise to fame and his unexpected disappearance. The two and half years I spent with Walter were unforgettable, and along the way he taught me several life lessons I hold dear. Here are five of them.

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Sunday 01.17.21

GERARDO VIZMANOS

In the photographer’s latest book 'Things I Do When I’m at Home,' Gerardo Vizmanos documents his time in quarantine and steps in front of his camera for the first time.

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Wednesday 01.13.21

CHIQUITITA

Chiquitita, the artist formerly known as Juku, Juku for now and before that Harajuku, has been performing in the Brooklyn drag scene since she was 18 years old. Her recent rebirth as Chiquitita came about after co-starring in a transcendent performance of the Abba song of the same name with one of her favorite people, Charlene Incarnate. We asked one of our favorite people, drag performer Baby Love, to sit down with Chiquitita for a one-on-one conversation. The duo are good friends, and even host a podcast together, Shows BK. we had no doubt the conversation would get real deep, real quick.

 

So I’m here, reporting live for GAYLETTER from my living room. So formal.

 

I guess I don’t really know the full story about what’s going on with you and the magazine. They told me I had to do this or they would kill my family. I’m kidding. I’ll just say it. I love talking about myself. They asked if I was interested in doing a birth of Venus shoot, sort of in parallel to like the birth of me, because I just changed my drag name to Chiquitita after a year and a half of contemplating names. It is a rebirth in a way. I don’t know where it’s going to be in the issue, but I hope that it’s the cover because it’s really stunning.

 

Why did you change your name? I started doing drag when I was 14. I chose the name Harajuku when I was 14, 15. …

Friday 01.08.21

LARRY STANTON

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Tuesday 01.05.21

SHAMIR

This autumn, Shamir released his seventh full-length release, Shamir. Our favorite countertenor has been taking his time to nurture his craft, game, and it-ness in Philly’s DIY scene. Since Hope and Revelations (both released in 2017), Shamir has released the full-length statement records Resolution (2018), Be the Yee, Here Comes the Haw (2019), and Cataclysm (2020). These document Shamir’s artistic growth from cutie caterpillar eco-nerd toward the winged pop star we encounter, cocoon-less, on Shamir. We love to see it. I spoke with the artist in the late summer about pop stardom and visibility, the butterfly, mental health, Scorpio, Capricorn, the Oracle Twins, and two pairs of twin moms. Peep our star-crossing conversation below.

 

 

I noticed you began to use the butterfly image during Revelations, and by now it’s really flourished and multiplied. What does the butterfly help you symbolize? It was always a natural thing. It’s weird, one of my closest friends lives in Ottawa, and there’s a moth outburst there. At first, we thought it was butterflies, but he actually did some research and talked to his neighbors, and it’s a moth outburst. They’re blind; they run into you and hit you, and that shit hurts, you know? Anyway, I told him, “moths are cousins of butterflies,” and then I sensed this tingle — this was literally yesterday — and I was brought back to another time in my life. At the beginning of middle school, that’s when I was an eco-nerd, I had three different fish tanks in my room. …